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Best Cornhole Boards 2013We’ve selected 10 of our favorite boards that were posted to the Cornhole Game Players gallery from April to June of 2013.  There are some really cool boards here.  A really interesting mix, including Chive boards, some sports teams, an awesome Star Wars set, a deer hunting set, one for Quiddich, a Philadelphia set, and even one made with hardwood flooring!

Our “10 Best” are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum. Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery. We also post all of the best boards on our Cornhole Facebook and Cornhole G+ pages.

Our goal when picking our Best Boards is to highlight designs, styles, customizations, and builds that we haven’t seen before.  We also like to chose boards that are visually awesome, some boards just have that wow factor.  A great picture also helps, even the best set of boards can fail to impress with a grainy, lo-res picture.

What do you think of the boards?  Let us know in the comments or on Facebook!

8 Best Boards of Q2 2013

 

View bigger versions of these boards on our Gallery!

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Best Boards Q1 of 2013The first few months of 2013 were pretty quiet around the forum.  There might not have been as many awesome boards as we usually have, but there were definitely a few worth sharing.  Our 6 best boards from January, February, and March of 2013 represent a pretty solid mix of what’s happening in the world of cornhole board building.

We’ve got a few full board decals, a couple that are hand painted, and a couple that show off some of the more creative things you can do when building boards.

Our “Best 6″ are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum. Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery. We also post all of the best boards on our Cornhole Facebook and Cornhole G+ pages.

How do we pick boards? More than anything, the boards should stand out from the crowd.  Awesome design, skilled craftsmanship, awesome paint job, ultra shiny poly, or maybe unusual features.  It’s all based on a picture, so the photo should be taken in a way that makes the boards look awesome.  Showing them as a pair is also important.  With thousands of boards posted over the last few years, it gets harder and harder to find unique designs, and things that are really unique, but we always do!

Best Cornhole boards


View bigger versions of these boards on our Gallery!

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Built & Painted Cornhole Boards in less than 6 Minutes? This awesome stop motion video from EASTENN on the Cornhole Game Players forum does just that.

Awesome to get a feel for the whole process, as well as to see some of his Cornhole board building tricks.

If you’d like to read more about this video, check out the forum post at Cornhole Game Players.

Check out the video!

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When it comes to casual outdoor games, many of the most popular ones are meant for only a small handful of players. In the right atmosphere, games like Cornhole, Badminton, Ladder Toss, etc. can be a lot of fun – but they’re somewhat limiting in terms of participants at a given time. So naturally, if you have a bigger group looking to play around outside, you need to look for other options.

There are popular choices for team outdoor games as well. Kickball, disc golf, ultimate frisbee, etc. can all incorporate fairly large groups of people. But here are 3 more options you might not always think of for casual outdoor games for teams.Handball1

Dodgeball

For some reason, people tend to think of Dodgeball as exclusively an indoor sport. Sure, it helps for the walls in a gym to contain stray balls, but the bottom line is, Dodgeball is one of the most versatile team games in existence. Play with volleyballs, order dodgeballs online, or if you want to get more intense about things, try it with tennis balls. You can set your own boundaries, make up your own tweaks to the rules, and even come up with various ways of making this a drinking game. One idea: every time a player gets knocked out, he or she has to complete a minor drinking challenge in order to re-enter the game. Of course it’s best to take it easy with these kinds of details, but it can add a new dimension to the game.

Handball

It’s always surprising how few people play this sport, but it’s actually a pretty big deal. Team Handball is actually an Olympic sport! It’s major in Europe, and you can even publicly bet on matches at Betfair news! This is a sports book online that covers all major sports with various gambling options, and sure enough, Handball is right there. Yet considering all you really need to play the sport is a ball and a few improvised goals, it’s incredibly easy to play in a backyard, the quad at a college, etc.

Quidditch

Let’s get something straight: playing Quidditch – the sport invented in the Harry Potter franchise – is completely ridiculous, and the movement to turn it into an NCAA sport is well beyond insane. Fun fact: people can’t fly on broomsticks, so this sport can’t exist. However, if you feel like taking it lightly and goofing off with some friends, it can’t hurt as a backyard guilty pleasure. You can set up goals pretty much any way you want, find a few different sized balls, and improvise a bit with some of the less realistic details of the game. For example, try giving “beaters” water balloons instead of balls. Consider having someone on the sideline randomly launch a tennis ball into the air now and then to simulate the “snitch.” It’s all ridiculous, but with the right tweaks it can be fun.

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BestOfBadge_Q4-2012Fourth quarter brings the end of the season, as Winter takes hold.  It’s also when we see some of the best Cornhole boards, as people have had all year to dial in their handiwork.  This quarter we managed to narrow it down to our 16 favorite boards.  There’s a solid mix of creative design ideas, awesome wraps, stain/paint combinations, and a few other creative touches.

We have a great mix of themes this time around. NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, College Teams, Army, Philly, Texas, and even some giant sized boards!

The boards in our top 16 are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum. Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery.  We also post all of the best boards on our Facebook Cornhole page.

How do we pick boards?  When it comes to judging boards, there’s a lot to be said for the “Wow” factor.  A picture doesn’t do board construction much justice, so the design or overall look of the boards is really the most important thing here.  Enough can’t be said for the quality of the picture taken, too.  It’s amazing how many times we have to exclude awesome boards because the pictures are SO bad.

BestOf_Q4-2012-grid16

Thanks to everyone who shared their awesome boards! Click here for the full board gallery

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BestOfBadge_Q3-2013The third quarter of the year is always a great time for Cornhole Boards.  July, August, and September are some of the best months for both playing and building cornhole boards.  The Summer of 2012 was another great one for boards.  We have a solid mix of creative design ideas, awesome wraps, and even some wood burned and air brushed boards.

We have a great mix of themes this time around. NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, College, Air Force, California, and even some hunting boards.

The boards in our top 16 are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum. Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery.  We also post all of the best boards on our Facebook Cornhole page.

How do we pick boards?  When it comes to judging boards, there’s a lot to be said for the “Wow” factor.  A picture doesn’t do board construction much justice, so the design or overall look of the boards is really the most important thing here.  Enough can’t be said for the quality of the picture taken, too.  It’s amazing how many times we have to exclude awesome boards because the pictures are SO bad.

BestOf_Q3-2012-grid

Thanks to everyone who shared their awesome boards! Click here for the full board gallery.

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BestOfBadge_Q2-20122012 is really the year of the vinyl wrap for Cornhole Boards.  More and more, the design skills are being put to use in a computer before the physical boards even exist.  Hand painted logos and decals have some serious company with these wraps, but there are always going to be people who prefer one method to another.

When it comes to judging boards, there’s a lot to be said for the “Wow” factor.  A picture doesn’t do board construction much justice, so the design or overall look of the boards is really the most important thing here.  Enough can’t be said for the quality of the picture taken, too.  It’s amazing how many times we have to exclude awesome boards because the pictures are SO bad.

The boards in our top 12 are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum. Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery.best-cornhole-boards-Q212-all

Thanks to everyone who shared their awesome boards! Click here for the full board gallery.

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BestOfBadge_Q1-2012The first few months of the year are a really quiet time on the forum, as everybody is usually still in Winter mode.  2012 was a great exception.  The lineup of boards for Jan-Mar 2012 is one of the most impressive we have ever had.  These 12 boards represent a variety of interests, with Sports, movies, hunting, and even refrigeration!

The boards in our top 12 are pulled from the Gallery section of the Cornhole Game Players forum.  Boards are selected based on creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and photo quality. If you’d like to be included in future Best Boards events, all you have to do is share your boards in the CGP Forum Gallery.

Thanks to everyone who shared their awesome boards! Click here for the full board gallery.
BestOf_Q1-2012-grid


To view the full gallery, click here.

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While some people paint their Cornhole Boards, many people prefer to use vinyl decals.  Application can be tricky, and you often have only one good chance to get it done right.

We’ve collected some of the best tips from the Cornhole Game Players Forum to help you get it done!  CGP user names shown before the info.  Links to original posts at the bottom of the post.

Putting on Decals

Milky:  There are two main techniques for putting on decals. Wet, and dry. Wet simply means that you spray a slight (mist it) amount of water on the back of your decal, apply it, squeegee out the water and air, remove the backing tape, and you’re done. Dry means the same thing, but without the water.

For a first time decal applier, you may want to consider using the wet technique. You can put the decal down, slide it around, remove it, re-apply it, over and over until you’re ready. This technique is very forgiving. The downside is that it is difficult to get all of the water out, even with the squeegee. So, the application tape doesn’t come off of the decal as easy, and the decal doesn’t stick to the boards as easy. It can be a real pain in the butt sometimes. The wet technique is much more efficient for glass surfaces such as car windows, where the squeegee will remove all the water in a few swipes.

The dry technique is what I use. Make sure you have everything measured out perfectly as far as where you want to place your decal. Sometimes you can actually lay the decal out on the boards without it sticking. But some times the application tape and the decal are very sticky, and once it goes on, it’s pretty much stuck on.

The best advice I can give you is to take your time. Go slowly. Measure 4 times before putting your decal down. Lay it down from one side before adding any pressure, and work your way over, then work your squeegee/credit card from the center out to remove any air pockets.

A few more tips would be to run a hair dryer over the decal when you’re done. Don’t hold it too close to the decal or you could melt it. When you have an air bubble that you can’t squeegee out, you’ll need to pop it. What I do is make a small puncture in the side of the bubble with a razor blade, then run my thumb over it to squeeze the air out. Don’t worry about that small hole you still see, your poly will fill that in and make it unnoticeable.

I dont prefer the dry method because if you do get some good vinyl decals especially with some small lettering or parts to it, you can run into some trouble. I have noticed a few decals I have purchased from some guys on here that did not have as strong as adhesive as a lot of others I have used. Which I am sure works fine for cornhole boards 99% of the time.

rucraz2:  I recommend leaving the backing on the decal to get it set correct. Its a full proof way in my eyes. Then tape down the top and spray with Water/soup solution. As in the “wet method”. (just a drop of dishsoap to say 20oz of water) That way if you still fumble it your first time you can still work with it, vs having to struggle to get your stuck decal off to reposition. Then pull back the decal and lay it down. I have done decals enough that I could probably do a dry method, but I am still more comfortable doing the wet peel back method. So if you dont understand, here is a video how to on how we do it. But we usually dont do the middle tape. Just two pieces at the top then flip the entire thing over.

Rickster:  On boards I use a top hinge method (sometimes bottom depending on the decal design). Always dry. With backing on I center it side to side, then determine position top to bottom. Lets say 16″ (or whatever) from bottom to a given point on the decal so you can repeat it on the other board. With the decal in place I use 2 pieces of tape at the top. Note: it helps if the app. paper & backing paper are cut straight at this edge. Press the tape firmly down & use your thumb nail right at the paper edge. Fold the complete decal over & I try creasing the tape at the hinge. Start pulling the backing paper off from the top of the decal (at hinge) till a little of the decal is exposed & flip it back over & start sticking it down, slowly pull the backing paper off around an inch at a time while smoothing the decal down with a credit card or squeegee. Continue pulling & smoothing till done.

 

Reference Links

Removing decals?

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This edition of our Business Spotlight comes from Donnie, owner of DMAC SPORTS, makers of custom built cornhole boards in Bowling Green, KY.   What follows are Donnie’s responses to some basic questions about his business, and how it started and developed.

Q&A with DMAC SPORTS
Location: Bowling Green Ky

Made my first set of boards for myself, after being invited to a friends house to play. Had never heard of cornhole before. Was hooked immediately. So I checked around to find information on building myself a set, ran across a little site called Cornhole Game Players.  Asked questions and got a lot of support and advice from several people on the site. Made my first set as one board UK and 1 board U of L. they turned out fair. But my friends seen them and started requesting me make them some. So I thought not a bad little hobby to help relieve stress from my day job. When I look at those boards now and compare to what I currently make, I can’t believe anyone wanted those.

I make my boards out of the 3/4″ red oak from Lowes or Home Depot (depends on which has better material).
I use pocket screws and Liquid Nails to assemble each set, sand and then paint and stain, apply decals then spray at least 5 coats of Poly on each set. Use different color of stains , depending on theme, also do several with camouflage. Also make the mini versions that kids enjoy.

Well my hobby has turned into a part time job. Each set I make I strive to find ways to improve the quality of them, it must be working because I have a constant flow of orders. Most all I make are custom ordered. I made a few over the winter and set up at a local community yard sale one day recently. Sold 4 sets of full size and 1 set of my mini’s and got orders for 5 sets. Was very surprised at how well they were received.

I have set my workshop up to build these boards, and the money I have made has bought all my equipment. Still not in it to make a lot of money, I spend a lot of time on each set, so if you break the profits down to man hrs, not such a good business venture, but its stress releive is priceless.

I have worked out a good relationship with a couple of decal suppliers, and we have designed some new decals and have a very good relationship. That helps a lot on with the boards that I make.

The positive comments that I get on my boards helps me stay focused on a high quality product. when 50% of your customers are driving up to 2 hours to pick their boards up, it makes you feel good when they tell you they look better in person than in the pictures.

I have no plans to expand, and I’m actually considering slowing down some. This is my 2nd year of selling boards, only advertise on Craigslist and by word of mouth. Last year I averaged 5 sets per month, so made around 60 sets. So far this year I have already sold 40 sets and have orders for 5 currently. My normal build time is 7-10days, depending on my real job and keeping the wife happy with her to do list.

Been doing a few new designs with full boards using the vehicle wrap decal. Looks really good, but profit margin isn’t, so may not make many that way. I don’t want to raise my prices any higher. I work with a local lady that makes bags, and we have a good arrangement that helps us both.

I would like to give thanks to the members on the forum, their tips and information have been very helpful. Never thought I would be a wood worker, but its a good HOBBY/Business.

DMAC SPORTS can be reached by phone at 270-202-8588.

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